Wednesday, July 30, 2008

My Little Cabin In The Woods

My next trick is going to somehow convince the wife we need to buy a nice piece of property somewhere. When I say property I mean rural and I am talking at least 20 acres. If I go west in SC property gets real cheap...but we need to save some cash.

Believe me I am not hurting or anything me and the wife both have good jobs but we want to buy something and pay for it outright or have as small of a mortgage as possible. Right now that would be real tough...

My plan is to build and 2 or 3 room cabin on a piece of property somewhere, dig a well, install a septic system and solar panel for electricity. I would love to even put just a decent trailer on the property if that was a lot cheaper. I want to get a decent tractor and put that land to work with a garden and some animals.

I would love to build an outdoor range somewhere on that property as well to help keep the skills sharp.

Ahhh to dream.

Well I will be keeping my eyes open and if I come across a deal I can't refuse I will make it happen somehow.

My plan is if I get the land and can't build anything right away I can alway use the pop-up and camp for free. I would pack my generator and fill the pop-ups 23 gallon fresh water tank and be good to go. Plus if I get a decent tract I can always hunt on it.

I would love to get something with a pond on it...I have seen some nice properties with 2-3 acre ponds that were stocked. Fishing sounds good right about now...

I don't live in a city per se but the Charleston/Summerville area is filled with people and more show up everyday...so I want to move west away from tourist attractions and beaches...anything that draws people.

My wife says I am a simple man with simple needs and I think that will serve me well if the SHTF. I love the woods, I really do and I am one of those folks that could not talk to another human being for a year and it wouldn't bother me in the least...besides wherever I go my wife will go so I will never be alone.

Some people freak when they don't have cable for an hour. Technology isn't a right and you certainly don't need it to survive.

This is why I will do well if the SHTF.

...that is all.

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6 comments:

  1. I moved the woods this summer, no stocked ponds or anything--and its been a ton of work, lost 15lbs, and I wasn't fat to begin with. Besides being tired all the time, its beautiful and peaceful out here--with only dial-up internet/which has been a rough adjustment.

    If you plan on farming using tractors, you are just doing small scale industrial farming which again isn't a sustainable and makes you reliant on the system. Learn to garden with hand tools and without destroying your topsoil, otherwise your food growing get worse over time--even with animal excrement, compost and the like, learn to build no dig food tracts, so your topsoil doesnt all get washed away, and all the worms and microorganisms don't take off for soil that is less destroyed.

    October Fallout3 comes out BTW, should be my last video game for old times sake, and no need for internet connection to play it.

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  2. I ma so waiting for Fallout 3. I occassionally replay 1 and 2 just for the fun of it...

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  3. Land in SC is good. I'm going to try for some acreage in Southern NC. I have raised many large gardens and I'm also looking at ways to raise my own fuel, but I feel it's necessary to band together to guard the fuel tank, etc.: There have been numerous reports lately of thieves stealing farm fuel from tanks. I'm looking at a couple of relatively new ways to do this, but haven't made a decision yet. The following values are for doing them in the South; up North, yields are much smaller. Claims for one of them state that you can grow over 10,000 gallons of biodiesel per year per acre, but it requires a large investment in hydroponic greenhouses and other stuff. It is based on an algae that has been genetically manipulated to produce >10% oil by weight. I assume that all you need is to use skimmers to collect the algae and a high-pressure press to squeeze out all liquid from it. The oil automatically floats to the top. It should be easy to decant it and pump it to a storage tank; however, I suppose adding a small percentage of alcohol to the finished product will be sufficent to keep any remaining water in suspension. I think that the dried bricks from the press may be used as animal feed, etc. The other one yields over 1000 gallons of alcohol per acre per year. It uses a hybrid tall grass, miscanthus giganticus, that grows 15 feet high down South and as big around as a corn stalk at its base. You have to buy special enzymes to break down the grass cell walls, etc. to pre-process it, then you can make alcohol just as if you had started with corn. You can burn some of the dried grass stems to run the still. A huge benefit is that after the first year, no weeding is needed, very little fertilizer, and no cultivation. It is sterile and won't spread far, unlike bamboo. A major drawback is that because live plants must be planted instead of seed, it is very expensive to get started, and will have to be replaced in 15 years. A super-cheap alternative to this grass is to grow kudzu, using a tractor-mounted propane or kerosene burner (flamethrower) to keep it from spreading out of its assigned area. No fertilizer or cultivating is needed. However, it is estimated to yield only about 250 gallons of alcohol per acre per year. Corn yields about 300 gallons of alcohol per year, but requires lots of fertilizer, seed, and cultivation, so kudzu is an attractive alternative, as long as it doesn't bother your neighbors.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Land in SC is good. I'm going to try for some acreage in Southern NC. I have raised many large gardens and I'm also looking at ways to raise my own fuel, but I feel it's necessary to band together to guard the fuel tank, etc.: There have been numerous reports lately of thieves stealing farm fuel from tanks. I'm looking at a couple of relatively new ways to do this, but haven't made a decision yet. The following values are for doing them in the South; up North, yields are much smaller. Claims for one of them state that you can grow over 10,000 gallons of biodiesel per year per acre, but it requires a large investment in hydroponic greenhouses and other stuff. It is based on an algae that has been genetically manipulated to produce >10% oil by weight. I assume that all you need is to use skimmers to collect the algae and a high-pressure press to squeeze out all liquid from it. The oil automatically floats to the top. It should be easy to decant it and pump it to a storage tank; however, I suppose adding a small percentage of alcohol to the finished product will be sufficent to keep any remaining water in suspension. I think that the dried bricks from the press may be used as animal feed, etc. The other one yields over 1000 gallons of alcohol per acre per year. It uses a hybrid tall grass, miscanthus giganticus, that grows 15 feet high down South and as big around as a corn stalk at its base. You have to buy special enzymes to break down the grass cell walls, etc. to pre-process it, then you can make alcohol just as if you had started with corn. You can burn some of the dried grass stems to run the still. A huge benefit is that after the first year, no weeding is needed, very little fertilizer, and no cultivation. It is sterile and won't spread far, unlike bamboo. A major drawback is that because live plants must be planted instead of seed, it is very expensive to get started, and will have to be replaced in 15 years. A super-cheap alternative to this grass is to grow kudzu, using a tractor-mounted propane or kerosene burner (flamethrower) to keep it from spreading out of its assigned area. No fertilizer or cultivating is needed. However, it is estimated to yield only about 250 gallons of alcohol per acre per year. Corn yields about 300 gallons of alcohol per year, but requires lots of fertilizer, seed, and cultivation, so kudzu is an attractive alternative, as long as it doesn't bother your neighbors.

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  5. Great post Flea. You can do it, We are proof of that and enjoying the 15 acre farm. Just remember to check the area for your cabin in the woods.

    Together We Stand

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  6. you could make it on a lot less than 20 acres. we're on less than 2 (closer to 1, probably) and have plenty of space to grow fruit trees, grapes, a decent-sized garden with a greenhouse, raspberries---and way too much lawn that could eventually be converted to more garden... just sayin'. getting ready to build a tiny house, too!!

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